Friday, July 3, 2015

Sepia Saturday: Ask Your Mother

Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share family history through old photographs.


This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt features a field book drawing of a Spot Snapper. As such, the drawing is more scientific than artistic, focusing on particular identifying markings that distinguish one fish from another.

Behold this field drawing titled “Dad” executed in pencil on low-grade typing paper. This drawing was recently discovered almost completely hidden beneath napkins and salt shakers stuffed in a drawer of an old buffet. That explains the deteriorating condition of the drawing; nevertheless, we are grateful to have the field agent's personal autograph, increasing the value of this crude drawing considerably.

Pencil drawing of Barry by Zoe  http://jollettetc.blogspot.com


Note the markings that distinguish this Dad from others in the species:
  • Not all Dads have a moustache, but it was a popular trend particularly in the late 1980s and early 1990s, thus dating this fine field drawing. 
  • Standing with hands either in pockets or behind the back is the typical casual pose of many Dads.
  • The glasses suggest poor eyesight. This Dad appears to be a good candidate for LASIK eye surgery.
  • The belly line indicates the paunch resulting from poor diet and one too many beers.
  • The thick hair helps distinguish this Dad from Homer Simpson.
  • This field drawing is exceptional in capturing the sound of the Dad:  “Ask Your Mother.” Whether you are at the mall, at the ball field, at an amusement park, or even at church, you can hear the call of the Dad when he is trying to avoid taking responsibility for a decision.

Please visit the field agents at Sepia Saturday to see what fish tales they have to offer. You don’t need to ask your mother.



© 2015, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

37 comments:

  1. What a cute find!! I do agree, it had to be a dad :)

    betty

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  2. Wonderful fun! And perfect for the prompt. A great way to start the morning with a good chuckle.

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    1. Yes, it's always good to start the day on a positive note.

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  3. Ask your mother - LOL, a fun find and thanks for sharing this unusual family artifact!

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    1. Thanks Marian. And I'm glad you found your way to my blog.

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  4. Loved your analysis of the "field drawing."

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  5. Yep, heard that often and also in the reverse...Ask your Dad...which I would reply "Please Mom would you ask him for me. He never says NO to you! What a terrific find in the field of napkins. Hope you have a great 4th of July!
    Sue at CollectInTexas Gal

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  6. Too funny. Does Mr. B and Z know they made the blog today? HAHA!

    Such a great picture! You should have it framed. =)

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    1. No, they don't know. Funny -- Mr. B asked what the prompt is for NEXT week but didn't mention this week at all, so I didn't have to spill the beans.

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  7. Tee hee...a cute take on this week's theme and anatomically correct too!

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  8. I enjoyed your take on this week's theme looking for the distinguishing characteristics of one example of a dad over others

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  9. We have the Dad species here in Maine, too...but I've never seen such a detailed field drawing of one! I'm grinning...

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    1. Yes, I'm aware that the Dad has spread worldwide.

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  10. I love uncovering those little treasures :) And so soon after Father's Day.....that picture is worth taping on the inside of a cabinet to make you smile each time it is opened.

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    1. Excellent analysis, Wendy. Field sketches are often difficult to decipher, but this artist has captured the principal distinguishing marks of the species.

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    2. Marey, the drawing is a definite keeper. It always makes me laugh, not just smile.

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    3. Mike, yes, this artist certainly captured the essential markings. Good eye and good ear.

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  11. So do you know who the artist was? Our favorite thing was to ask one parent only to be told "go ask the other parent". At which point we would say to the second parent "first parent said it was fine if it is okay with you". I'm sure most kids learn this trick at some point in their lives.

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    1. Oh yes, we know her well. Could you not read the signature? The drawing looks very light on my laptop, but I can see it fine on the regular computer. (HINT: Daughter #2 -- she drew this when she was quite young which makes it even funnier to us.)

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  12. Great field sketch, with accompanying notes of details for identification of 'dad'...what a jolly species most of the time!

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    1. Yes, it is a jolly species. Thankfully they are not endangered.

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  13. I'm not sure that the field sketch is anatomically correct as Alex suggested, but the accompanying field notes provide all the characteristics of the species.

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  14. Hilarious! We are now equipped to easily identify the male of the species.

    What a precious discovery. Yes, this one needs to be saved for posterity ;)

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    1. Oh yes, it's saved! I do worry about that pencil though -- how long will it last?

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  15. Wendy, does Zoe remember drawing this? Funny comments from you to interpret the dad of the species. Even funnier that Zoe got it all so well.

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    1. Nancy, yes, she absolutely remembers drawing this picture. It's funny the little things kids pick up on.

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