Friday, August 31, 2012

Sepia Saturday: The Test of Time


Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share family history through old photographs.





This week’s Sepia Saturday prompt features a typical country store with numerous goodies to catch the eye.  Most prominent is the clock. 

The Techtron is a pretty clock but notorious
for being non-repairable.  
When my granddaddy Orvin Davis got up in the morning and wandered out into the living room, he probably checked the time on his Techtron Ship’s Bell mantel clock.  

There's the clock on the mantel.
Lucille and Orvin Davis holding my sister Mary Jollette

In the morning I wipe the sleep from my eyes and check the time here:  




















The Ansonia clocks with porcelain body
were often painted with flowers
or idyllic scenes.  




When my great-aunt Velma Davis Woodring was a bride, she might have gone into her dining room to check her lovely porcelain Ansonia clock to know when to start dinner.  

  







If I want to know whether to start dinner, all I need is a remote control.



























This Seth Thomas tambour-style clock has simple lines.



When my great-aunt Helen Killeen Parker was cooking, her Seth Thomas mantel clock might have reminded her to take a look at that roast.  









I just look here:  




In the evening when the busy-ness of the day came to an end, my great-grandmother Mary Sudie Eppard Rucker probably relaxed in her favorite chair and drifted off to sleep to the gentle ticking of her Seth Thomas Adamantine mantel clock.  She might even have been awoken by the rich cathedral-like chiming on the hour.  


Sudie Rucker's clock went to my mother
and then to my sister.

This clock on YouTube sounds like what my great-grandmother used to hear.




Today we’re awoken by an annoying beep and glowing red numbers.  













Unlike the handsome mantel clocks my sister and I inherited, it’s doubtful any of our modern clocks will stand the test of time.


I hope you have time to check the clocks at Sepia Saturday.  




©2014, Wendy Mathias.  All rights reserved.

47 comments:

  1. I love clocks! There are some really gorgeous ones out there. The mantel clocks are my favorite.

    I usually check the time on my cell phone. :)

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    1. I'm so low-tech, I didn't think of the cell phone. I still use the ol' flip phone but never check the time on it.

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  2. I love clocks and ticking but unfortunately hubby can't stand a ticking clock. I'm an analogue girl rather than a digital girl and I get very confused with a 24 hour clock and have to use my fingers. It's difficult to teach the children the time these days as we were taught quarter past ten and they are taught 10.15 or quarter to six and now it's 5.45. Oh how times have changed (not always for the better).

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    1. I know what you mean! Funny how technology impacts our language and descriptions of everyday tasks.

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  3. ... "it’s doubtful any of our modern clocks will stand the test of time." Sometimes I have that very same question about everything we store digitally. I mean, when Microsoft has managed to sell us Windows21, can we still decipher this? But as the Rolling Stones already said (more or less): Time is on our side, yes it is!

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    1. Yes, I worry about all the work I've done on the computer. I keep delaying printing stuff off because I know I'll find something new, a new person or new date, and I'll need to print it all over again.

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  4. How wonderful that you and your sister have inherited those wonderful chiming clocks. There's something very comforting about the sound they make.

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    1. I agree that the sound is very soothing. But with the dishwasher, washing machine, dryer, and tv, a clock doesn't stand a chance.

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  5. Great post about clocks "then and now." That youtube video was interesting. What a beatiful-sounding clock! Oh, and thanks for not posting a youtube video of that last alarm clock. I already know what that kind sounds like...ya, annoying!

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    1. HA -- you're welcome! I figured that one was probably very familiar.

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  6. My family never had any special clocks. I did have an interesting little clock that once was my mother's, but I didn't keep it wound. I'm glad that we don't have to keep clocks and watches wound now.

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    1. You've reminded me how bothersome it was to have to wind a watch, even. I'm sure I used not to think so before there was any other option. But I would hate that now.

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  7. Good to see a variety of mantel clocks again. We just have two small carriage clocks otherwise it's cooker, microwave, computer or TV although I still have two travel clocks with alarms to wake me up in time for golf.

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    1. I have a two-legged clock that gets me up for anything on the day's schedule.

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  8. Liked you clocks then and now - but the old are so much better! My step-dad has some clocks that belonged to his grandparents. One is very similar to the porcelain clock in your post and another a bit like the Sudie's mantle clock, but not as fancy. He loves old clocks to this day. (kathy at abbieandeveline.com)

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    1. The older clocks do have more character, I'll grant you that.

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  9. What a lovely pictorial history - thank you!

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  10. Oh, Wendy! Mom has clocks like Sudie's and Helen's at her house. The remote control one cracked me up. I really enjoyed you post; I think you got it covered!

    Kathy M.

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    1. I think those clocks were fairly common. Glad you like the remote control picture -- I guess I could have spiffed up my shoes for the occasion!

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  11. I loved the way you interpreted the theme and they way you introduced each item. My favourite - your great aunt's porcelain clock.

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    1. I like that one too. It's really "my colors."

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  12. What an interesting look at clocks. I have lots of them in the house and none of them are reliable except for the microwave. You're right that the new ones will never stand the test of time. they will all be in the landfill.

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    1. I can never seem to get the coffee pot, microwave, stove, tv, and phone to have the exact time, so time is always relative in my house.

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  13. It looks like you and your sister have a nice collection of family clocks. It's interesting how seldom there are old photographs of clocks and the only reason we see them is because they are in the background of a photo with some other focus. At least that's how it looks in your family photo and how it is in my family photos.

    This was a fun comparison of how the clocks we use change over time.

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    1. Yes, you're right -- no photos with the clock as a feature, just part of the background. I can only assume everyone just took the clock for granted.

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  14. Very clever, Wendy, and you really picked up on our 21st century time habits. I dislike the glow of digital and prefer the analog clocks to measure the course of an hour.

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    1. I tried to buy just an old fashioned wind-up alarm clock, but I couldn't tolerate the LOUD ring. Cheap thing!

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  15. Excuse me, could you please tell me what time it is? Does anybody really know what time it is? Great photos, the ship clocks are a favorite of mine too! Even just the wooden steering wheel from a ship!

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    1. Ha -- really! I don't have two clocks with the same time, so I probably couldn't tell you what time it REALLY is.

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  16. Some lovely clocks and some utilitarian ones. I have the clock that belonged to my great-grandfather. He was a farmer so I imagine the sun was more useful to him than the decorative clock.

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    1. Yes, I've heard farmers know precisely the hour just by looking at the sun. But I wonder if hunger helps too.

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  17. Funny that I am on Granddaddy's lap -with my "paah" and I get his clock that probably won't be repairable! It kind of "ticks" me off. hahahahaha! I kill me...

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  18. Love the old mantel clocks, but I too usually check the more modern appliances for the time, more specifically my iPhone which I carry with me where ever I go.

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    1. The iPhone is a little modern marvel.

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  19. Lovely collection of clocks you and your sister have inherited. I've always loved the ticking sound of an old clock. Can't stand the digital clocks of today, the red light is too bright at night and they have no character like the clocks of the past. Enjoyed your post!

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    1. I agree. There is something very soothing about the soft and steady ticking of an old clock.

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  20. A most inventive 'then and now' post. Your inherited clocks certainly combine the practical with the decorative. I always associate chiming clocks with my grandparents.

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    1. Me too -- chiming clocks and grandparents kind of go together.

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  21. What a great post. I loved all the examples of the different clocks in your life and how you related them to cooking. Why else would you need a clock?
    Nancy

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    1. I've delayed replying because I've been wondering if there really is another need for a clock. HA. I guess if I were still working I'd need that clock to help me get out the door on time.

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  22. What a great variety of clocks, Wendy, I think my favourite is the Techtron. My grandparents had to stop the grandfather clock when I stayed with them as a child - it kept me awake. My current alarm clock wakes me without beeps - it has a light which comes on slowly - no more frights in the morning :-) Jo

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    1. Hi Jo. I've heard of clocks that use a light, but I've never seen one in action. The sun coming in my window doesn't seem to wake me up, so I wonder what kind of power that clock must have.

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  23. I love that each clock has its own story. I started a few years ago to make photos of the clocks in our family. You inspired me to continue with it. A lovely post!

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    1. Thanks! I've been photographing all my "STUFF" to make a little heirloom notebook for my daughters so that they'll know whether something is valuable or just sentimental. Sometimes I look at things I've inherited and wonder about who it belonged to and why they kept it. Hopefully the notebook will one day help them decide whether to keep something or pitch it. HA!

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  24. For me, the microwave oven shows me the time in the kitchen, my cellphone most time, and my PC the rest of the time... What a nice collection!! while I like the look of the Seth Thomas mantel clock, I was surprised by how pleasant the Seth Thomas Adamantine mantel clock was. I expected something really annoying...
    Good show!!
    :)~
    HUGZ

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