Friday, February 17, 2012

Sepia Saturday: Men and More

Sepia Saturday challenges bloggers to share family history through old photographs.





This week’s Sepia Saturday challenge features a 1912 photo of actor Claude Rains.  Alan suggested many ways to interpret the photo:  actors, monocles, pointing, men in chairs.  I wanted so desperately to find among my family photos a picture of someone pointing.  But it seems I come from a long line of people who were taught it’s not polite to point.  However, I have no shortage of pictures of men in chairs.  




The man standing is George Clift, the abusive ex-husband of my great-grand aunt Sallie Jollett Clift (read more about her HERE and HERE).  I don’t know who the man sitting is; he does not resemble either of George and Sallie’s sons.  This picture must have been taken prior to 1914, the date of their divorce decree.  I can’t imagine why anyone even held on to this photo given what George put Sallie through, but here it is nonetheless.

Oh my - lookie there – they’re wearing spats!  Just like Claude Rains!

And suddenly my Sepia contribution took a turn.  Here is my daddy Fred R. Slade Jr. as a young recruit in the Coast Guard.


Spats. 



23 comments:

  1. You father's photo reminded me of my Army days; thank goodness our gaiters (spats) were shorter than his.

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    1. Interesting. I had not seen this before. And I do have some sepia photos.

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  2. That was an unusual turn to take but I do like it when something like that happens. I haven’t got a man pointing or in gaiters so you’re ahead of the game.

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  3. Focusing on the spats, I almost didn't notice the "Keep Off" sign and the mystery man on the right edge.

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  4. Transcendental. Seeing almost anything in sepia quiets disturbing inner images for me. Even Joey Buttafuoco would look good in sepia.~Mary

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  5. I have to admit, George does not look very sympathetic. After reading the background story, i do feel very sorry for his wife and those poor children. It's interesting to see him anyway. The photo of your father is wonderful, not least because of the young man off to the side.

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  6. Nice spats! I like the photo of your father.

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  7. Great photos.I am now off to read the story of your Great Great Aunt.

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  8. I wouldn't have noticed the spats in the first photo without you pointing it out, unlike your father, they are humdingers.

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  9. Now I'm wondering what was the purpose of spats anyway. So, have to read about your aunts and google spats.

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  10. Both of these photos are marvelous, especially the second one. I'm thinking the first photo was saved more for the man seated perhaps. Funny how these days people are more apt to photo shop people they don't want from photos if they don't just cut them out! But back then I think they did value/appreciate their photos far more then today! Thanks for such a delightful post!

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  11. As much as I love seeing old photos, it's the stories behind them that give them life. Your aunt Sallie's story is a tragic one.

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  12. Yes, he does look pretty mean. I too will read the story of Sallie. Very interesting post. Your fathers photo is a treasure.

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  13. Congratulations on spotting the spats! Though I admit your father's are hard to miss.

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  14. A creative turn on the theme. The first picture led me to read more about your ancestors' tragic past. And to think about the similar stories in my family...

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  15. The man seated seems in almost formal dress, with white tie and double row buttons on the cuffs, and George has a cigar in his fingers too, which makes it an unusual photo. I like the sailor photo especially for the accidental elements.

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  16. Very interesting family story - it seems we all have them. I like the picture of your father - what are the things on this lower legs?

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    1. They're spats, or more specifically gaitors, I believe. I think the tall style used in the military and for protection (like for welders and lumberjacks) are called gaitors. Spats are probably just decorative. But I'm not Tim Gunn, so don't hold me to this explanation.

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  17. Kind of you for posting his picture, despite his history...
    You can burn it now, like he must be right now.
    I like the idea of spats, but underneath the pants, not above, like in your daddy's pic. Nice pic though!
    :)~
    HUGZ

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  18. When Daddy's picture came up, I almost jumped because I see Joel! The gentleman off to the side of Daddy must have been a friend. He is in several of daddy's coast guard pictures.

    Maybe we didn't take that picture of George when we visited Vessie. I'm sure she would have known the spat wearer guy.

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  19. I see Joel too. Please join me in "doo doo dooing" the Twilight Zone theme.

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  20. Spatacular! :) Maybe the reason was only to keep the ankles warm?

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